Thirsty Thursday: Olianas, Perdixi, Isola Dei Nuraghi, Sardinia Italy 2012

Happy Thirsty Thursday everyone. The weekend draws near. To help get us there, we travel (metaphorically) to the island of Sardinia.

Sardinia Map

Just South of Napoleon’s Corsica, Sardinia has been the Mediterranean’s Scotland: isolated, occasionally invaded, but fiercely independent. Interestingly, grapes from Southern France and Spain, not Italy, trickled down here.  Carignan, Grenache, Syrah, Cab, Rolle dominate plantings.

The IGT “Isola dei Nuraghi” confuses nearly everyone but Italians.  It covers the whole island of Sardinia. These Nuraghi are ancient towers, some 7,000 survive from a pre-phoenician civilization (1900 BCE to 730 BCE).

Nuraghe Sardenia

They are cool towers but have little to do with wine.  This IGT exists to keep grapes varieties off labels and free winemakers of the more restrictive DOC rules. And thus Olianas’s winemaker, Stephano Casadei ferments 50% Bovale (aka Graciano), 25% Carignano, and 25% Cannonau (aka Grenache) separately, blends, and then pops the wine into French bariques for a year.  They call it Perdixi: Italian for partridge. Let’s try it.

Olianas, Perdixi, Isola Dei Nuraghi, Sardinia Italy 2012

Olianas Perdixi Sicily
Its APPEARANCE looks a clear, medium plus ruby rimmed color with a purple core. AROMAS smell of plus intense, layered kirsch, dried blueberry, lavender, ginger snap cookies, tobacco, and salt. The PALATE feels dry, with medium acidity, soft tannins, a moderated, warm alcohol akin to slow-burning stones at a spa. The body is medium plus and texture feels smooth, modern, yet somehow lean. FLAVORS are medium intense but complex: black cherry, iron, hay, dark sugar, raspberry, and candied orange peel.

Olianas’ Perdixi  is a modern, slick, well-balanced yet not boring red with ample complexity for grilled meats, lamb, funky tempeh, aged hard cheese, garlic, tomato magic.  Very good (4 of 5).

Advertisements

About waywardwine

Follow Wayward Wine (WSET3) to tour the world's exciting vineyards, breweries, and distilleries, while discovering new drinks.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s